Mold & Mildew

This is a hot topic.  So much so that the State of New York requires a special license for testing and mitigation.  Inspectors can only refer you to someone who has the proper licensing.  That being said, the collection of links and articles here simply give you a start on what mold is, what its impact on your home can be, and what are the different ways it can be mitigated.  Be warned:  Molds and Mildews removed improperly can affect your health and grow back.  Always consult with a qualified individual as to the best approaches your case may require. 

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Good places to start, but fairly generic. Lots of links inside of these links.

Ten Things You Should Know about Mold

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by:
    1. Venting bathrooms, dryers and other moisture-generating sources to the outside
    2. Using air conditioners and de-humidifiers
    3. Increasing ventilation
    4. Using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing and cleaning
  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.
  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.

These are private companies. No endorsement here. Quite specific in how they handle mitigation